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Article
December 12, 1966

CARLOS J. FINLAY (1833-1915) STUDENT OF YELLOW FEVER

JAMA. 1966;198(11):1210-1211. doi:10.1001/jama.1966.03110240118043
Abstract

F inlay's inquiries into the spread of yellow fever, a tropical and subtropical endemic disease manifested by pyrexia, jaundice, albuminuria, and hematemesis, began in a logical fashion with the study of the environment. Shortly after he graduated from medical school, his search for the mode of spread reached the first peak of progress by implicating, from deductive speculation, the Culex mosquito as the vector; it continued through his close liaison with the Yellow Fever Commission of Reed and associates in 1902 and was climaxed by greater recognition posthumously for his contributions than he received during his productive years.

Carlos was born to a French mother in the city of Puerto Principe (now Camagüey) in Cuba, where his Scottish father was a practicing physician and coffee grower.1 His early schooling was begun under a paternal aunt who had moved to Cuba and was continued at Havre, France. However, it was

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