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Article
October 26, 1963

Council on Drugs

JAMA. 1963;186(4):325-326. doi:10.1001/jama.1963.03710040051010
Abstract

An Inhalation Anesthetic Fluroxene 

(Fluoromar  )FLUROXENE is a pleasant-smelling, potent anesthetic agent which has explosive and flammable limits close to the concentrations used in general anesthesia. Although very uneconomical to use by other than rebreathing techniques, fluroxene can be administered by open and semi-open as well as by closed absorption techniques, in combination with oxygen or a nitrous oxide-oxygen mixture. Because of the rapidity with which changes in depth of anesthesia may occur, the blood pressure level and respiratory tidal volume must be carefully monitored. Animal experimentation has demonstrated the dangers of administering epinephrine during fluroxene anesthesia. Therefore, because of the possibility of producing cardiac irregularities, the use of epinephrine or levarterenol during administration of fluroxene to man is inadvisable.

Actions and Uses  Fluroxene is a volatile liquid with an anesthetic potency similar to that of diethyl ether. It is flammable in air in a 4% to 12% concentration; although

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