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Article
December 14, 1912

THE JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN MEDICAL ASSOCIATION

JAMA. 1912;LIX(24):2154-2158. doi:10.1001/jama.1912.04270120139022
Abstract

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SATURDAY, DECEMBER 14, 1912 

SOME UNTOWARD FEATURES OF SUBCUTANEOUS NUTRITION  The desirability of having some appropriate procedure whereby food can be introduced into the organism at times when, owing either to pathologic developments or to surgical complications, the participation of the alimentary tract in the digestive preparation of the food is precluded, has encouraged repeated attempts to devise a suitable substitute for the natural ingestion of our nutrients. There are published records of numerous attempts at subcutaneous and other forms of parenteral nutrition with complete avoidance of the gastro-intestinal canal. In the case of the soluble carbohydrates, such as dextrose, some success has apparently been achieved. The employment of fine emulsions of oil for subcutaneous injections has found temporary advocacy through the researches of Mills

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