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Article
December 21, 1912

UNILATERAL OPTIC ATROPHY AND CONTRALATERAL HEMIPLEGIA CONSEQUENT ON OCCLUSION OF THE CEREBRAL VESSELS

Author Affiliations

Intructor of Neurology and Neuropathology at the University of Pennsylvania; Clinical Assistant to the Philadelphia Orthopedic Hospital and Infirmary for Nervous Diseases PHILADELPHIA

JAMA. 1912;LIX(25):2248-2249. doi:10.1001/jama.1912.04270140052018
Abstract

Occlusion of one middle cerebral artery producing hemiplegia on the opposite side of the body is an everyday occurrence; furthermore, optic atrophy as a result of obliteration of the retinal vessels on the same side is well known, but the combination of unilateral optic atrophy and contralateral hemiplegia is seldom encountered and might be very confusing.

Cases of this kind have been described by Elschnig,1 Gowers,2 Hughlings Jackson,3 Siegrist,4 Williamson,5 Batten and Guthrie,6 Guthrie and Mayou,7 Oppenheim,8 von Monokow9 and Starr.10 With the exception of a brief reference in Starr's text-book, I have not been able to find any description of this symptom-complex in American literature; therefore it seemed important to record the following cases.

The first case was seen in the service of Dr. John K. Mitchell at the Orthopedic Hospital and Infirmary for Nervous Diseases, and the second

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