July 23, 1892

To the Editor of the Journal of the American Medical Association:

JAMA. 1892;XIX(4):111. doi:10.1001/jama.1892.02420040023003

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To answer the many inquiries of the gentlemen who were present at the operations at Harper Hospital, during the late meeting of the Association, I wish to state that all cases of laparotomy recovered. In the first difficult case of Dr. Joseph Price, of Philadelphia, where he predicted that a fecal fistula might develop, this actually took place, but by keeping in the glass drainage tube for three days and then substituting the rubber tube and also by keeping the tract perfectly aseptic with hydrogen peroxide and covering the wound with bi-chloride gauze, the fistula gradually closed up, in the course of three weeks, and the patient is now about, walking, riding, etc.

The second case where a hole was made in the intestines, which had to be sewed, made a rapid and uneventful recovery.

The case operated upon by Dr. Ross, of Toronto, with the most firm and extensive

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