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Article
November 12, 1892

EDITORIAL NOTES.

JAMA. 1892;XIX(20):592-593. doi:10.1001/jama.1892.02420200028008

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Abstract

" Dr." Conan Doyle, the Modern Scott.  —The author of "The White Company," a late work of laborious historic fiction, was for eight years a medical practitioner. He possessed a degree of the University of Edinburgh, and for a time held the post of a steamship surgeon. His varied experiences in both frigid and torrid zones have without doubt served as seed-thoughts to his fertile imagination when composing those character studies or stories that are now so much sought after by the fiction-reading public. Conan Doyle has long since ceased to sport his medical title, and has only once or twice referred to his early struggles with the healing art. His books have so marked a historic tendency that they are read by students, at least, with the same kind of interest that was awakened by Sir Walter Scott. He says of himself that he devoted two years to study of

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