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Article
December 3, 1892

TO WHAT EXTENT SHOULD CLINICAL INSTRUCTION BE AFFORDED STUDENTS OF MEDICINE IN REGULAR COURSE.

Author Affiliations

DEAN OF NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY MEDICAL SCHOOL, (CHICAGO MEDICAL COLLEGE,) CHICAGO, ILL.

JAMA. 1892;XIX(23):664-665. doi:10.1001/jama.1892.02420230014001b

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Abstract

The subject of Clinical Instruction, as a part of the regular medical training required for the student during his attendance on his college courses, is one of much importance, and should receive more attention than has been hitherto given it. That the student should receive sufficient true clinical training to make him familiar with the means and methods of the examination of patients, the diagnostic symptoms of diseases, and the application of remedies, before being authorized to commence the practice of medicine and surgery, is generally admitted.

Whether such clinical training should take place while the student is actively engaged in prosecuting his medical college studies, or should be assigned to one or two years after he has completed the college curriculum, is a question concerning which much might be said. If the student is required to have a good general education and a fair degree of mental discipline before

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