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Article
January 10, 1903

A STUDY OF SIR JAMES PAGET IN HIS WRITINGS.

Author Affiliations

PROVIDENCE, R. I.

JAMA. 1903;XL(2):92-98. doi:10.1001/jama.1903.92490020024001h
Abstract

"Examine men's ruling principles, even those of the wise, what kind of things they avoid, and what kind they pursue."—Antoninus.

By chance I was searching English medical journals for a special item two years ago, at the time they were containing obituaries of Sir James Paget. My attention was held by the ring of personal affection and esteem in practically every mention. Their essence seemed to be: He was a great surgeon and pathologist, an ideal teacher and lecturer, and the best loved of his profession in Great Britain. Any one of these records in the book of fame would satisfy a large majority; and the wish arose to learn more of their combination in a single individual. The question came to mind: How far may the personality of a scientific man be revealed by his writings?—"the subtlest form." Phillips Brooks has said,

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