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Article
March 14, 1903

THE GLYCOSURIC SYMPTOM OF DISEASE AND ITS MEDICINAL TREATMENT.

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK CITY.

JAMA. 1903;XL(11):691-696. doi:10.1001/jama.1903.92490110007001a
Abstract

An unusual amount of grape sugar in the urine is by no means an absolute indication of the presence of diabetes mellitus; it may be concomitant with, or sequential to, various other transitory, as well as chronic, anomalies. Thus glycosuria in its alimentary form e saccharo may be induced in the presence of various traumatic and non-traumatic neuroses; of alcoholism; of Graves' disease; of gastrointestinal disorders, as hyperacidity; of hepatic affections, etc.

Glycosuria, mostly of the spontaneous transitory type, may appear after injury and extirpation of less important organs; after ether and chloroform anesthesia; after administration of drugs and chemicals like phloridzin, mercuric bichlorid, chloral, morphin, strychnin, amyl nitrite, curare, thyroid preparations, adrenalin, etc.; after inhalation of carbon monoxid; after the excessive use of tobacco; during the luetic process, and during or after infectious diseases.

Generally speaking, non-diabetic glycosurias are the result of intoxications, that is, of slight or graver

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