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Article
March 14, 1903

THE GROWTH OF THE TUBERCLE BACILLUS AND ORGANISMS RESEMBLING IT ON FRUITS AND VEGETABLES.

Author Affiliations

DIRECTOR HYGIENIC LABORATORY, U. S. MARINE-HOSPITAL SERVICE. WASHINGTON, D. C.

JAMA. 1903;XL(11):701-702. doi:10.1001/jama.1903.92490110017001c
Abstract

At one time the tubercle bacillus was looked on as standing in a class by itself, sharply differentiated from all other micro-organisms, but not long after its recognition two important points came to light; first, that there are other organisms, especially the streptothricæ, that have the power of producing lesions resembling the tuberculous granulomata; and secondly, that there are other organisms resembling the tubercle bacillus in some of its biologic and staining characteristics. The fact that the tubercle bacillus stains with difficulty and decolorizes with corresponding difficulty was for a long time regarded as peculiar to this organism. This staining peculiarity was looked on as a definite and final test, quite as specific as a chemical reaction. But now we know a whole group of acid-proof bacteria widely distributed in Nature, that resemble the tubercle bacillus closely enough in certain features to cause confusion and errors in diagnosis. These

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