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Article
March 21, 1903

THE PLANTAR REFLEX IN EPILEPSY, WITH SPECIAL REFERENCE TO THE BABINSKI PHENOMENON.

Author Affiliations

MIDDLETOWN, CONN.

JAMA. 1903;XL(12):756-762. doi:10.1001/jama.1903.92490120001001b
Abstract

There is a wide diversity of opinion among writers and observers as to the nature and variety of the reflexes in epilepsy with brief, if any, allusion to the plantar reflex, which apparently either escaped observation or was not recorded until within a comparatively recent period. I find no reference to the subject by Gray or Dercum. Dana1 says: "Immediately after the attack there is a temporary exhaustive paralysis with loss of knee-jerk." Hare2 says: "Reflexes are decreased or lost in epilepsy immediately after an attack." Osler3 states that "after the attack the reflexes are sometimes absent; more frequently they are increased and the ankle clonus can generally be obtained." Strümpell4 says: "The cutaneous reflexes are still suspended directly after an attack; but the tendon reflexes are generally somewhat exaggerated, although sometimes they are diminished or absent."

Gowers5 states that "for a few seconds after a severe fit reflex action

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