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Correction
April 13, 2011

Clarified Text Description in: Does This Patient Have Splenomegaly?

JAMA. 2011;305(14):1414. doi:10.1001/jama.2011.429

Clarified Text Description: In The Rational Clinical Examination article entitled “Does This Patient Have Splenomegaly?” published in the November 10, 1993, issue of JAMA (1993;270[18]:2218-2221), the description of “Percussion of Traube's Space” has been clarified. In the middle column on page 2219, the paragraph should read as follows: “The patient is supine, with the left arm slightly abducted for access to the entire Traube space (after its description by Ludwig Traube, who ascribed its disappearance to pleural effusion, not an enlarged spleen),11 defined by the sixth rib superiorly, the anterior border of the spleen, and the left costal margin inferiorly (Figure 4). With the patient breathing normally, the surface of this triangle is percussed across 1 or more levels from its medial to the lateral margin, which is approximately the midaxillary line. Normal percussion yields a resonant or tympanitic note. Splenomegaly is diagnosed when the percussion note is dull.12

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