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Correspondence
December 2000

Diagnostic Patterns and Delays in Pemphigus Vulgaris: Experience With 99 Patients

Arch Dermatol. 2000;136(12):1569-1570. doi:

Pemphigus vulgaris is a chronic autoimmune disease affecting the mucosa and skin and resulting in epithelial acantholysis, bullae formation, and chronic ulceration.1 Skin lesions of pemphigus vulgaris present clinically with typical bullae formation and ulceration. However, oral mucosal manifestations are less characteristic, typically occurring as multiple, chronic mucosal erosions or superficial ulcerations of various sizes and rarely presenting with intact bullae.2 Although pemphigus vulgaris is widely considered a skin disease, several reports of cases and case series have described it frequently as the initial, and occasionally the exclusive, site of involvement.2,3 Thus, the unfamiliar features of oral pemphigus vulgaris could result in longer diagnostic and treatment delays than cutaneous pemphigus, which could adversely affect treatment response and prognosis.4,5 The present study explored the natural history and diagnostic pattern of pemphigus vulgaris among 99 patients, with specific interest in the differences between oral and cutaneous pemphigus.

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