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Editorial
February 2016

Online Reviews of PhysiciansValuable Feedback, Valuable Advertising

Author Affiliations
  • 1The Center for Dermatology Research, Department of Dermatology, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, North Carolina
  • 2Department of Pathology, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, North Carolina
  • 3Department of Public Health Sciences, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, North Carolina
JAMA Dermatol. 2016;152(2):143-144. doi:10.1001/jamadermatol.2015.3951

This is the best time to be alive in human history. Technology has objectively improved our lives in countless ways. In dermatology, this is perhaps best exemplified by the treatments we now have for psoriasis. Just a few years ago, we would have been ecstatic for a cyclosporine-like drug that did not cause renal adverse effects, but now we have biologic drugs that are far safer and more effective than we would have dreamed of.

Electronics have revolutionized our lives. Smart phones give us entire libraries at our fingertips, searchable by voice command; the ability to communicate on the spot with our family, friends, and medical colleagues; and countless other ways to spend our time, productively or otherwise. We have medical technologies that can peer inside the body completely unobtrusively, and we have medical record systems that remind us of needed screenings, warn us of potential harmful interactions, and, for better and worse, put the entire medical record of a patient’s care at our disposal.

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