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September 2016

Increased Airport Scrutiny by the Transportation Security Administration of a Patient-Passenger Carrying Ammonium Lactate–Containing Moisturizer

Author Affiliations
  • 1Department of Dermatology, Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, Michigan
  • 2Dermatology Service, Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York
  • 3Organic Synthesis Core Facility, Chemical Biology Program, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York
  • 4Pharmaceutical Product Service, Research Pharmacy Core, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York

Copyright 2016 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.

JAMA Dermatol. 2016;152(9):1054-1055. doi:10.1001/jamadermatol.2016.2665

After the deadliest terrorist attack on American soil on September 11, 2001, the 107th Congress passed the Aviation and Transportation Security Act on November 19, 2001, and established the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) to oversee all modes of transportation, including air travel. Subsequently, after a liquid explosives threat in 2006, the restrictions further tightened so that travelers could carry liquids onto airplanes only in conformance with the “3-1-1 liquids rule,” ie, in containers no larger than 3.4 ounces (100 mL) in a 1-quart plastic bag. Then in 2010, after the attempted bombing of a flight from Amsterdam to Detroit, the Explosives Trace Detection Test (ETDT) was implemented, a screening process that involves “swabbing” for explosive materials. The TSA prohibits items on airplanes such as explosives and/or flammables, firearms, food items, self-defense items, sharp objects, sporting goods, and tools; however, items of all types are subject to scrutiny. The final decision whether to allow an item onto an airplane rests with the individual TSA agent.1

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