[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 54.161.216.242. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Correspondence
February 2001

On the Immunopathogenesis of Psoriasis

Arch Dermatol. 2001;137(2):229-230. doi:

In an interesting article "Response of Murine and Normal Human Skin to Injection of Allogeneic Blood-Derived Psoriatic Immunocytes," Nickoloff et al1 present an innovative idea that immunocytes expressing receptors of natural killer (NK) cells play a possible role in the pathogenesis of psoriasis. The authors suggest that the inhibitory receptors on NK cells (killer cell inhibitory receptors [KIRs]) may prevent NK T-cell–induced lysis of self major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I–bearing target cells while killer cell activating–receptors (KARs) may activate NK T-cell cytotoxicity and probably contribute to the damage of the epidermal basement membrane in the early stages of disease.

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×