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Editorial Review
May 2002

Mad Cows, Prions, and Wrinkles

Author Affiliations

From the Division of Dermatology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver.

Arch Dermatol. 2002;138(5):667-670. doi:10.1001/archderm.138.5.667

Degenerative cerebral diseases affecting humans and other animals have been observed for many years. A contagious group of these diseases in vertebrates is known as the transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs). In the mid-1980s, an epidemic of one of these diseases, bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), was recognized in Britain. Transmission to humans was suspected, and subsequently a more virulent form of the disease was recognized in cattle and humans. This has raised considerable public concern about the safety of bovine-derived products and caused a dramatic reduction in consumption of these products. The frequency of cosmetic bovine collagen injections has decreased recently in Britain and elsewhere in Europe.1

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