[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
December 1920

SCLERODERMA AS A POSSIBLE MANIFESTATION OF CHRONIC ARSENIC POISONING

Author Affiliations

LOS ANGELES

From the Department of Dermatology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston.

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1920;2(6):747-756. doi:10.1001/archderm.1920.02350120075010
Abstract

In three consecutive cases of diffuse scleroderma seen at the Massachusetts General Hospital within the past six months, the urine has given positive tests for arsenic. One patient, a storekeeper, had kept powdered arsenate of lead under her counter for over four years to kill mice; another had handled glazed paper in a paper box factory for ten years; the third had been exposed to the use of insecticides about the house for a number of years, but so far as could be ascertained, this occurred after the onset of the scleroderma. Further investigation into the records of two other patients, who had died, showed that they had probably been exposed to arsenic. All five of these cases were examples of diffuse scleroderma with brown pigmentation, and the condition of the three patients whom I saw personally and whose urine was positive for arsenic began with sclerodactylia, that being at

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×