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Article
May 1923

ASPERGILLUS IN SCALP LESIONS FOLLOWING RED-BUG (LEPTUS) BITES

Author Affiliations

DALLAS, TEXAS

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1923;7(5):599-602. doi:10.1001/archderm.1923.02360110028004

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Abstract

One of the most common insect nuisances in certain sections of this country, particularly throughout the South and Southwest, is Leptus. This insect is a minute red bug, visible to the naked eye only by close observation, and is especially abundant in rank grass and other vegetation in the early summer. It is popularly known in Texas and in some other sections of the country by the names "red-bug" and "chigger," the latter name being likely to confuse it with the "jigger" or chigoe, a sand flea (Dermatophilus penetrans) of South America and certain sections of Africa. Leptus is an active insect and from contact with grass and weeds during the season of prevalence one may become covered with these bugs. On close inspection, they may be seen running about on any part of the body, but particularly where clothing obstructs progress. They commonly collect below the garters or the

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