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Article
August 1923

STUDIES ON THE ETIOLOGY OF PEMPHIGUSI. BACTERIOLOGIC FINDINGS IN A GROUP OF CASES OF PEMPHIGUS

Author Affiliations

Associate in Experimental Dermatology, Mayo Clinic ROCHESTER, MINN.

From the Section on Dermatology and Syphilology, Mayo Clinic, Dr. John E. Stokes, Chief of Section.

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1923;8(2):204-232. doi:10.1001/archderm.1923.02360140041006
Abstract

In this investigation an attempt has been made to isolate a possible etiologic organism in cases of chronic pemphigus by thoroughly studying the whole blood obtained from patients, and, whenever possible, making use of material obtained from fresh, uncontaminated blebs and bullae free from secondary changes.

Thus far, seven strains of an organism, which will be described, have been obtained from the blood of as many different patients. In one instance, the organism was isolated from the fluid of bullous lesions as well as from the blood. Positive blood cultures were found repeatedly in all of the cases investigated, and the organisms were morphologically and culturally the same. On further immunologic study they proved to be serologically identical, or related in their agglutination properties when tested with homologous and heterologous serums for cross-agglutinins. Serums from three patients, similarly tested, showed agglutinating power for several of the strains employed. A group

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