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December 1925

FUNGUS INFECTIONS OF THE SKINREPORT ON CULTURAL STUDY OF FLORA OF RINGWORM

Author Affiliations

Demonstrator in Dermatology, McGill University; Assistant in the Department of Dermatology, Montreal General Hospital MONTREAL, CANADA

From the Dermatological and Pathological Departments of the Montreal General Hospital.

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1925;12(6):853-857. doi:10.1001/archderm.1925.02370120083008
Abstract

This report is based on the investigation of a series of 140 cases of ringworm seen at the dermatologic clinic of Dr. G. Gordon Campbell, at the Montreal General Hospital, during a period of approximately a year and a half.

Early in the investigation, in some cases we were not able to obtain the causative fungus in culture, but with growing experience, our results in this respect have very much improved.

The methods used have been those outlined by Sabouraud.1 Initial cultures from hairs, scales, etc., have usually been readily obtained on glycerin agar. When necessary, numerous plants have been made to ensure the isolation of the fungus in pure culture. The plan of drying the scales or hair stumps for a few days in sterile test tubes, particularly when taken from moist areas, has been found extremely helpful in retarding or preventing the growth of associated bacteria.2

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