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Article
November 1930

THE RÔLE OF YEASTS IN THE PRODUCTION OF SUPERFICIAL DERMATITIS

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO

From the Division of Dermatology of the Department of Medicine of the University of Chicago.

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1930;22(5):790-802. doi:10.1001/archderm.1930.01440170016002
Abstract

Dermatology has passed through several eras, among them the externist era of Hebra, the internist era of the French school and the bacterial era of Unna. The present era may be classified as the biologic era, and considerable interest has been evinced in the biology of fungus infections.1 The reasons for this are at least twofold: Fungus infections are undoubtedly on the increase, and are better recognized than they were a few years ago; secondly, there is a possibility of culturing fungi from several inflammatory dermatoses of unknown etiology. The question then arises as to whether the living organism is merely a secondary invader or bears etiologic relationship to the disease.

It is generally recognized that the presence of hyphae denotes fungus infection, although it would seem that a preexisting plantar dysidrosis predisposes to infection with fungi, so that this possibility must not be overlooked in therapeutic management, Intertrigo

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