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December 1931

THE CHEMOTHERAPY OF RINGWORM INFECTIONPRELIMINARY REPORT

Author Affiliations

PHILADELPHIA

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1931;24(6):1033-1052. doi:10.1001/archderm.1931.01450011050005
Abstract

We have long harbored the point of view that the science of chemotherapy introduced by the genius of Ehrlich was applicable to local, as well as to systemic infections. In 1922, Schamberg and Kolmer1 demonstrated that a technic could be devised to determine the relative value of different compounds in killing fungi (fungicidal) or in restraining their growth (fungistatic). In the investigation referred to, thirty-one compounds were studied, including the common drugs used against ringworm, as well as various mercurials and dyestuffs. Some of the dyestuffs had a fairly high fungistatic power but were weak in killing the fungi employed. The mercurials, particularly mercurophen and bichloride of mercury, were far superior to all other compounds investigated.

In 1928, Kingery and Adkisson2 studied the effect of thymol, volatile oils and other substances on the growth of fungi. They found thymol, cinnamon oil and oil of

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