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Article
October 1933

CALCIFICATION OF THE SKIN AND SUBCUTANEOUS TISSUES (CALCINOSIS)

Author Affiliations

SAN FRANCISCO

From the Department of Dermatology and Syphilology and the Department of Pathology of the Mount Zion Hospital.

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1933;28(4):510-520. doi:10.1001/archderm.1933.01460040053006
Abstract

Abnormal deposits of calcium salts in the various tissues of the body are a frequent occurrence. These are found commonly in arteriosclerotic patches, in caseous tuberculous nodules and in chronic lesions following a pyogenic infection such as calcification of the pleura; also secondary to fat necrosis, in thrombosis of the veins and arteries, following trauma and occasionally in certain benign and malignant tumors. Calcification occurs rarely in the skin and subcutaneous tissues.

The term calcinosis is used by Durham1 to indicate the abnormal presence of calcium in any of the tissues of the body. Most authors, however, limit its meaning to those instances in which the pathologic calcification is found in the skin and subcutaneous tissues. Two forms are recognized. One is the result of a disturbance in calcium metabolism; the other is the result of metastasis of calcium salts from normal depots of calcium in the body. The

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