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Article
July 1936

PATHOGENESIS OF THE CUTANEOUS COMPLICATIONS OF VARICOSE VEINS

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO

From the Peripheral Circulatory Clinic, Department of Surgery, Northwestern University Medical School.

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1936;34(1):97-102. doi:10.1001/archderm.1936.01470130100009
Abstract

The pathogenesis of the cutaneous complications of varicose veins is usually explained on the basis of chronic passive congestion of the skin and of the subcutaneous tissues, which results from venous stasis in the varicose superficial vessels. Many of the clinical features of these complications, however, are not compatible with this explanation and support, rather, the interpretation, expressed in previous publications,1 that the cutaneous lesions are of inflammatory origin, arising by extension from phlebitis of the varicose veins. One of the principal arguments in favor of this hypothesis is the topographic relationship between the cutaneous lesions and the varicose trunks.

Attention has been called to the value of infra-red photography2 for visualizing subcutaneous varicosities. By means of this method it is possible to demonstrate an immediate topographic association of varicose eczema and ulcer with subjacent dilated trunks. In the accompanying illustrations are seen various types of

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