[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
September 1939

PIGMENTATION FOLLOWING THE USE OF IRON SALTS

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1939;40(3):380-381. doi:10.1001/archderm.1939.01490030037004
Abstract

Iron salts have been used extensively in the treatment of ivy poisoning since White1 in 1873 first called attention to their use. Ferric chloride is one of the chief means of combating the poison of Rhus toxicodendron. It was popularized by McNair2 after Browning3 advocated its use. This means of therapy has usually brought good results and no ill effects, as attested by numerous writers.4 However, cases have been reported in which pigmentation of the skin occurred. This has always been considered permanent. Traub and Tennen5 reported 2 cases, and Sutton6 and Pusey7 reported others. MacKee8 observed 4 cases. In all, 8 cases have been recorded in the literature. These undesirable results, so far as can be determined, have not cooled the ardor with which ferric chloride has been employed in the treatment of ivy poisoning. The predominating impression that pigmentation is

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×