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Article
January 1940

LXXXVII.—CHROMOMYCOSIS OF THE FACEREPORT OF A CASE AND A STUDY OF THE CAUSATIVE ORGANISM, PHIALOPHORA VERRUCOSA

Author Affiliations

Mycologist to the Barnard Free Skin and Cancer Hospital, the Barnes Hospital and the Washington University School of Medicine; Resident in Dermatology ST. LOUIS

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1940;41(1):42-54. doi:10.1001/archderm.1940.01490070045005
Abstract

Chromomycosis (chromoblastomycosis), or dermatitis verrucosa, is a disease which has received little attention until recently, because of the small number of cases. Clinically it is a dermatitis usually of the extremities (hands or feet), which may be papular, nodular, verrucoid or granulomatous, with or without ulceration and abscess formation and usually yellowish brown. There has been no report of a systemic invasion, lymphangitis, pain or pruritus except in 1 case.1 The microscopic picture may resemble that of tuberculosis, sporotrichosis, blastomycosis, syphilis, a granuloma or a foreign body reaction. However, brown thick-walled cells are seen in the tissue, probably chlamydospores, with intracellular wall formation and no budding. These structures are usually seen within the abscesses or giant cells.

The almost regular occurrence of the process on the extremities makes a lesion on any other part of the body seem unusual. With the exception of the first case reported in the

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