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Article
January 1941

DERMATOLOGIC ASPECTS OF TUBEROUS SCLEROSIS

Author Affiliations

READING, PA.; SPRING CITY, PA.

From the Pennhurst State School, Pennhurst, Pa., and the Department of Dermatology, Graduate School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia.

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1941;43(1):1-41. doi:10.1001/archderm.1941.01490190004001
Abstract

In 1880 Bourneville1 reported the pathologic changes occurring in the brain of a 3 year old girl with epilepsy, arrested physical development, hemiplegia, idiocy and "acne rosacea and pustulosis of the face." At necropsy islets of hypertrophic sclerosis were found distributed over the cerebral hemispheres. Because of the potato-like appearance and consistency of the cortical nodules, Bourneville called the process tuberous sclerosis.

Although Bourneville originally described the condition which bears his name as a pathologic entity, it is probable that the first case of tuberous sclerosis was reported by von Recklinghausen2 in 1863. The latter recorded the presence of sclerotic areas in the brain and myomas of the cardiac muscle in a newly born child.

In 1885 Balzer and Ménétrier3 described a symmetric condition of the face consisting of flesh-colored, discrete papules, which he called adenoma sebaceum. Five years later Pringle4 reported in a number of

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