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Article
December 1941

ALOPECIA LIMINARIS FRONTALISCOMMENT ON CAUSATION AND REPORT OF FOUR CASES

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK

From the Department of Dermatology and Syphilology, Harlem Hospital (service of Drs. S. Irgang and E. R. Alexander).

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1941;44(6):1082-1085. doi:10.1001/archderm.1941.01500060103009
Abstract

Alopecia liminaris frontalis was first described by Sabouraud1 as a clinical entity and was classified among the rare diseases of the scalp. He considered it an acneform eruption, characterized in its initial phase by squamous and crusting lesions, which finally evolved to permanent baldness with scarring. The disease usually begins in adolescence as two symmetric and subacutely inflamed itchy patches situated in the temporal regions just above the hair line. From here the condition extends anteriorly as two narrow margins which meet at the midline, thus forming a bandlike eruption around the forehead. Scales, crusts and minute pustules are the characteristic lesions in the early stage. They are followed by gradual death of the hair papillae, leaving a characteristic alopecia with hardly visible retracted scars. The disease spreads rapidly if not treated early. In all the cases but 1 reported so far the patients have been women and girls;

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