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Article
June 1945

MELANIN PRODUCTION IN SKINII. FURTHER HISTOCHEMICAL OBSERVATIONS

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK

From the Skin and Cancer Unit of the New York Post-Graduate Medical School and Hospital, Columbia University.

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1945;51(6):376-383. doi:10.1001/archderm.1945.01510240022005
Abstract

An earlier report1 dealt with the influence of protoplasmic poisons, such as potassium cyanide and sodium fluoride, and of alkalinity on the Meirowsky phenomenon (the increase in epidermal pigment in excised or cadaver skin when incubated at 37 C. and higher or on exposure to ultraviolet rays). These poisons served to accelerate the formation of pigment. It was further reported that in the experiment in which the solution containing the skin sections was overlaid with liquid petrolatum there was demonstrated an increased acceleration in pigment production. On the basis of this evidence it was suspected that atmospheric oxygen possibly was not required for the production of this phenomenon.

Earlier investigators of this phenomenon all came to the conclusion that atmospheric oxygen was required for its elicitation. The most recent and comprehensive studies of this problem, by Miescher and Minder2 and, incidentally published before

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