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Article
May 1947

PIGMENTATION FOLLOWING APPLICATION OF IRON SALTSReport of a Case in Which It Was Not Permanent

Author Affiliations

NEW HAVEN, CONN.

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1947;55(5):692-693. doi:10.1001/archderm.1947.01520050094014
Abstract

Until fairly recently, iron salts (ferrous sulfate or ferric chloride) have been widely used in the treatment of dermatitis caused by contact with the poison ivy plant. In 1917 Pusey1 called attention to the possibility of permanent pigmentation as a result of the use of iron salts. In the case reported by him the iron salt used was ferrous sulfate, 1 ounce (30 Gm.) to 1 gallon (4,000 cc.) of vinegar. Despite Pusey's warning this form of treatment remained popular and even gained in popularity, possibly because of the work of McNair2 in 1921. In 1936 Traub and Tennen3 reported 2 cases observed by them in which a permanent pigmentation occurred following the use of ferric chloride solution in the treatment of dermatitis venenata. They also mentioned 4 cases which had come under the observation of McKee some years before. Then in 1937 Sutton4 reported a

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