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Article
January 1948

CUTANEOUS DISEASES AMONG ARMY PERSONNEL IN JAPAN

Author Affiliations

NEW HAVEN, CONN.

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1948;57(1):128-131. doi:10.1001/archderm.1948.01520130131013
Abstract

Cutaneous diseases among army personnel in Japan were modified to a great extent by circumstances which were different from any that had been encountered during the preceding war years. With the war over, the soldiers' fears and anxieties were lessened, living quarters were more comfortable, facilities for cleanliness were more easily available and strenuous training or fighting over terrain, which had often been the cause of the onset or aggravation of dermatoses, had ceased. The incidence of neurodermatitis and other neurogenic dermatoses dropped considerably. Dermatitis venenata from poisonous vegetation disappeared, and the incidence of complicating ecthyma, pyoderma and cellulitis became less frequent.

On the other hand, the men and women of the occupation army were living in a country disrupted economically and socially, with health and sanitation among the natives at a low level. Fraternization produced consequential parasitic diseases and venereal infections. Scabies became the most frequently seen cutaneous disease,

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