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Article
April 1948

CONSTRICTION OF THE FINGER SIMULATING AINHUMReport of a Congenital Case

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO

From the Department of Dermatology, Northwestern University Medical School, Dr Edward A. Oliver, Chairman.

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1948;57(4):741-743. doi:10.1001/archderm.1948.01520170139016
Abstract

A case of congenital anomaly simulating ainhum of the little finger is reported, because a search of the available literature failed to disclose any similar report.

True ainhum is usually encountered as a tropical or semitropical disease of great chronicity. It usually occurs in the Negro and is confined, with rare exceptions, to the male. Ainhum is characterized by spontaneous amputation of the toe, usually the fifth toe and in some cases the fourth toe. The amputation is the result of a constricting band or line of demarcation which gradually forms at the proximal interphalangeal joint of the fifth toe and gradually deepens its furrows until there is spontaneous amputation.

All cases of digital amputation are not true ainhum. Ainhum-like constrictions of the digits occasionally occur as symptoms of, or associated with, an underlying constitutional disease. The two types, true ainhum and ainhum-like syndrome, should be distinguished from one another.

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