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Article
April 1950

PARADOXIC EFFECT OF ANTIHISTAMINIC DRUG

Author Affiliations

CAMDEN, N. J.

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1950;61(4):667-668. doi:10.1001/archderm.1950.01530110133011

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Abstract

The antihistaminic drugs have been widely and successfully used for treatment of a variety of allergic skin diseases. Urticaria heads the list as far as percentage of cases relieved is concerned. Dermatitis venenata or contact dermatitis is another condition for which these drugs are frequently given to reduce itching.

In common with other medicines, the antihistaminic drugs frequently produce undesirable side effects, such as drowsiness, headache and nausea. It is distinctly unusual, however, for one of them to cause the very disease which it is used to treat. Following are reports of 2 such cases, 1 of urticaria and 1 of contact dermatitis produced by tripelennamine ("pyribenzamine") hydrochloride.

REPORT OF CASES

Case 1.—Mrs. G. S. C., aged 36, the wife of a physician, had had a chronic recurrent vesicular dermatitis of the fingers and hands for six years. This had been variously diagnosed as pompholyx, a fungous infection and contact

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