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Article
May 1950

MICROSPORUM GYPSEUM AS AN ETIOLOGIC AGENT OF TINEA IN THE UNITED STATES

Author Affiliations

GALVESTON, TEXAS

From the Department of Bacteriology and Parasitology, University of Texas School of Medicine.

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1950;61(5):824-829. doi:10.1001/archderm.1950.01530120115011
Abstract

WHILE recognized as one of the causative agents of tinea capitis of childhood, Microsporum gypseum is rarely encountered in the cases observed in the continental United States. This type of tinea is due ordinarily to an infection with Microsporum audouini or Microsporum canis. Now and then some species of Trichophyton is responsible.

Emmons1 cited the earliest isolation of M. gypseum in the United States as having been made during 1931 in New York. Occurrence of the species has found little mention since. The published lists of causative fungi in cases of tinea have not included M. gypseum.

Apparently, the organism has rarely been observed in this country. Known infections by it have occurred occasionally in New York and in a few instances elsewhere.2

In view of the rarity of M. gypseum infection as reported in this country, we think it of interest to report that such infection

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