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Article
October 1951

OCCUPATIONAL LEUCODERMA FROM RUBBER DUST AND DEBRIS

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO

From the Department of Dermatology, Northwestern University Medical School, Dr. Herbert Rattner, Chairman.

AMA Arch Derm Syphilol. 1951;64(4):441-443. doi:10.1001/archderm.1951.01570100058010
Abstract

OLIVER, Schwartz, and Warren1 were the first to report their observation that leucoderma may occur as a result of occupation. In their patients areas of depigmentation developed after contact with rubber containing the antioxidant monobenzyl ether of hydroquinone. Since then, W. D. McNally2 presented a number of similar cases of depigmentation in Negro workers. Peck and Sobotka3 discussed in great detail the experimental and physiochemical aspects of this pigmentary disturbance. Spencer4 later recorded additional cases of leucoderma due to "agarite alba," the trade name of the antioxidant monobenzyl ether of hydroquinone.

Recently we have encountered nine cases of leucoderma in white workers who came in contact with dust and debris containing "agarite alba." These workers are machine operators who sew thin rubber strips onto asbestos pads. In the course of this operation a heavy alkaline oily dust is created, which settles down upon the face, hands,

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