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Article
December 1951

CORTISONE IN THE TREATMENT OF RECURRENT ERYTHEMA MULTIFORME

Author Affiliations

MEMPHIS

From the General Medicine and Hematology Section of the Medical Service, Veterans Administration Medical Teaching Group, Kennedy Hospital.

AMA Arch Derm Syphilol. 1951;64(6):783-785. doi:10.1001/archderm.1951.01570120118013
Abstract

Erythema multiforme is usually a self-limited benign disease, but occasionally it follows a recurrent course with repeated eruptive manifestations.1 We have recently encountered a patient with many recurrences of the disease in whom cortisone seemed to exert a beneficial effect.

REPORT OF A CASE  A 35-year-old Negro man entered Kennedy Hospital for the 13th time on Jan. 6, 1951. Since December 1946, he had had 12 previous admissions for the treatment of erythema multiforme. On each occasion he had had mucosal lesions beginning as papules and progressing to vesicles and bullae which in turn ulcerated and became secondarily infected. Papular lesions of the forearms, fever, malaise, and marked local pain were usually present. The lesions healed without scarring. Previous therapy consisted of a variety of local applications, antibiotics and chemotherapeutic drugs, a series of smallpox vaccinations, tonsillectomy, and elimination of dental foci. Elimination diets and antihistamine drugs were also

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