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Article
June 1952

INFLAMMATORY RINGWORM DUE TO TRICHOPHYTON FAVIFORMEReport of Two Cases

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK; STATEN ISLAND, N. Y.

From the Department of Dermatology and Syphilology of The Post-Graduate Medical School of New York University-Bellevue Medical Center (Dr. Marion B. Sulzberger, Chairman) and the Skin and Cancer Unit of the New York University Hospital.

AMA Arch Derm Syphilol. 1952;65(6):723-727. doi:10.1001/archderm.1952.01530250087009
Abstract

Trichophyton faviforme, known since 1893, has rarely been isolated in the United States. In 1947, Fowle and Georg1 reported 23 cases of suppurative ringworm contracted from cattle. These cases occurred in a farming community in central Pennsylvania. Cultural studies showed that 14 of these cases were caused by T. faviforme, and 4, by Trichophyton mentagrophytes. In the remaining five cases microscopic examination and cultures gave negative results, but the diagnosis of T. faviforme infection was made from the nature of the lesions and the history of contact with ringworm-infected cattle. In 1949 Carney2 reported 17 cases of T. faviforme infection occurring in Iowa farming areas. In most of the cases reported by Fowle and Georg, local treatment of the lesions proved of little value. They gave iodides intravenously and by mouth. Carney, however, stated that administration of mild fungicides and manual epilation were adequate.

The following cases

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