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Article
January 1955

CURETTAGE TREATMENT OF PLANTAR WARTS

Author Affiliations

MEDICAL CORPS, UNITED STATES ARMY

From the Dermatology Service, 382d General Hospital (Colonel George Prazak, Chief).

AMA Arch Derm. 1955;71(1):122-123. doi:10.1001/archderm.1955.01540250124026
Abstract

The treatment of plantar warts is generally unsatisfactory and the results of treatment may be disastrous. Roentgen therapy failures are all too common, and overdosage may lead to chronic radiodermatitis and ulcer formation. Recurrence is the rule rather than the exception after surgical excision. This recurrence may be in a signet ring manner; painful scars on weight-bearing surfaces may occur, and the possibility always exists of wound breakdown, with ulcer formation after surgery. This complication may lead to the necessity of skin grafting and prolonged hospitalization. An end-result of discharge from the service for disability is not unknown. Poor results and complications of treatment cause such trauma to the physician's professional pride that many refuse to treat the lesion with anything more than trimming of the corneous proliferation, and use of felt doughnuts and orthopedic appliances to relieve pressure. It is common for the patient with plantar wart to travel

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