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Article
November 1956

Venous Lakes

Author Affiliations

Iowa City; Omaha

AMA Arch Derm. 1956;74(5):459-463. doi:10.1001/archderm.1956.01550110003002
Abstract

Introduction

The physician's capacity to see lesions in the skin is conditioned by what he looks for, not by what he looks at. Dermatologists are not immune to this unhappily prevalent form of clinical fact blindness. It is only natural that skin lesions which produce symptoms, which itch, bleed, or disfigure, are noticed at the insistence of the patient. Others delight the connoisseur of the exotic, rare, or ornamental lesion of the skin. Many others are never noticed at all. There are very few descriptive studies which give us information about the frequency of occurrence of various kinds of skin lesions in the population at large, and among various racial strains and in different geographical locations. Likewise their secular change with time and even their regional distribution in the skin of the persons affected are known only to the expert. Such observations are rarely recorded

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