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Article
April 1961

Adult ScurvyReport of a Case

Author Affiliations

CHARLOTTESVILLE, VA.

From the Department of Dermatology, University of Virginia School of Medicine.

Resident in Dermatology, Department of Dermatology, University of Virginia School of Medicine (Dr. Weary); Professor of Dermatology, Department of Dermatology, University of Virginia School of Medicine (Dr. Wheeler); Professor of Dermatology and Chairman of the Department of Dermatology, University of Virginia School of Medicine (Dr. Cawley).

Arch Dermatol. 1961;83(4):657-659. doi:10.1001/archderm.1961.01580100121017
Abstract

Adult scurvy is uncommon in the United States and England1 because of the good nutritional status of the general population. When encountered, it is usually in elderly men who live alone and ingest a limited diet. The term "bachelor scurvy" has been applied to this group.2 Food faddism, pregnancy, alcoholism, or malnutrition associated with debilitating diseases are additional causes for sporadic cases. The following case is reported to call attention to some of the characteristic cutaneous and oral manifestations of adult scurvy.

Report of a Case  An unmarried, white male taxicab driver, age 58, was seen on Feb. 8, 1960, with a chief complaint of "sore, red feet for 3 weeks." The swelling and pain in his ankles had made it difficult for him to walk, although he was fairly comfortable when sitting or reclining. In addition, he was troubled by an exacerbation of "pyorrhea," which he had

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