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Article
August 1967

The National Plan of the American Medical Association

Author Affiliations

Philadelphia

From the Division of Scientific Activities, American Medical Association, Chicago.

Arch Dermatol. 1967;96(2):126-128. doi:10.1001/archderm.1967.01610020018006
Abstract

THERE ARE many problems associated with a physician's development of his own life-long program of continuing education. I would like to emphasize two of these.

One is that the physician cannot leave his practice, for any substantial amount of educational time, whether he be in solo or group practice. He can only do this at best on a periodic basis.

Secondly, the physician in practice must constantly face the problem of heavy demands on his time.

In addition to these two almost over-whelming problems, a special condition of education must be kept in mind, and that is that the learner must always want to learn what it is he is going to learn. Some people call the application of this principle "determining and meeting the educational needs of the learner." Other people, too often teachers, talk in general terms about motivation or the lack of it when physician-learners seem less

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