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Article
November 1967

ALLERGIC CONTACT SPANDEX DERMATITIS

Arch Dermatol. 1967;96(5):607-608. doi:10.1001/archderm.1967.01610050129023
Abstract

To the Editor.—  A recent article postulates that: ". . . [Mercaptobenzothiazole] or a closely related chemical is used in the manufacture of spandex" and is the cause of allergic contact polyurethane elastomer (spandex) dermatitis.1The fact of the matter, however, is that the most widely used American spandex fibers do not contain any mercaptobenzothiazole, nor is mercaptobenzothiazole used in the processing of spandex fibers.The Table gives the names of the various American manufacturers and their trademarks for spandex fibers which do not conSpandex Fibers Free of Mercaptobenzothiazole Manufacturer Trademark Dupont Lycra U. S. Rubber Vyrene American Cyanamid Numa Chemstrand Corp Blue "C"Mercaptobenzothiazole has, however, been used in the manufacture of certain British spandex fibers. In addition, some American spandex garments may be reinforced with rubber containing mercaptobenzothiazole. Certain latex base elastic used in spandex garments may also contain mercaptobenzothiazole.Rubber and mercaptobenzothiazole-sensitive individuals, therefore, must obtain spandex garments

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