[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 54.163.129.96. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
March 1969

NEW YORK ACADEMY OF MEDICINEDepartment of Dermatology and Syphilology

Arch Dermatol. 1969;99(3):370-375. doi:10.1001/archderm.1969.01610210124026

This article is only available in the PDF format. Download the PDF to view the article, as well as its associated figures and tables.

Abstract

Pseudoxanthoma Elasticum. Presented by Peter C. Lombardo, MD.  A white man, aged 42, who works as a band saw operator, presented with a chief complaint of poor vision of six months' duration. The patient was entirely well, with no personal or family history of strokes at an early age, gastrointestinal hemorrhages, skin disease, heart disease, or blindness until seven years ago when he was struck in is left eye at work by a heavy steel wire strap. He was completely blind in that eye for one year, then the vision gradually returned to normal. Two years ago, he was struck in his right eye with a sharp metal object and sustained a hemorrhage resulting in persistent loss of central vision. One year ago he had a spontaneous hemorrhage in the left eye manifested by "distorted vision." He has had three or four similar episodes in the past year, each followed

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×