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Article
August 1969

NEW YORK ACADEMY OF MEDICINE DEPARTMENT OF DERMATOLOGY AND SYPHILOLOGY

Arch Dermatol. 1969;100(2):250-257. doi:10.1001/archderm.1969.01610260126024

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Abstract

Acroangiodermatitis. Presented by Jack Rozen, MD.  A white woman, aged 25, noted 21/2 years ago the onset of a nonpruritic, nontender erythematous eruption on the dorsomedial aspect of the second and third toes of her left foot and a swelling at the base of these toes. There was no immediate antecedent trauma. The patient was pregnant at the time but had no peripheral edema or evidence of venous insufficiency. In August 1967, following a minor trauma, an ulcer developed on the dorsal aspect of the second toe, became secondarily infected, and persisted despite local medication. Treated with topical and systemic steroids and antibiotics, the ulcer began to heal slowly. At about the same time, however, the patient developed pain in the foot so severe that she was unable to walk, and the foot became intermittently swollen.The patient gave a history of possible frostbite to the foot at the age

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