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Original Contribution
August 1973

Griseofulvin in the Prevention of Experimental Human Dermatophytosis

Author Affiliations

Presidio of San Francisco
From the Dermatology Research Division, Letterman Army Institute of Research, Presidio of San Francisco. Dr. Allen is now with the Division of Preventive Medicine, Walter Reed Army Institute of Research, Washington, DC. Mr. Gunnison is now at Cornell University Graduate School, Ithaca, NY.

Arch Dermatol. 1973;108(2):233-236. doi:10.1001/archderm.1973.01620230033012
Abstract

The efficacy of griseofulvin administered to prevent experimentally induced inflammatory dermatophytosis was assessed in a randomized, double-blind trial involving six drug-treated and six placebo-treated subjects. Volunteers were challenged with a standard inoculum of spores from a zoophilic (granular) strain of Trichophyton mentagrophytes. One-gram doses of micronized griseofulvin daily provided significant protection against the development of florid inflammatory lesions (P<.01), but did not prevent minimal signs of infection from appearing in five of six drug-treated subjects. No lesions developed where heatkilled spores had been placed. Serial cultures of the ankle challenge sites were positive seven times less often in the griseofulvin-treated subjects than in the controls (P<.001). After stopping medication, inflammatory lesions developed in three of the drug-treated subjects, but in none of the placebo-treated subjects.

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