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Article
June 1978

Balance Beam Alopecia

Author Affiliations

Roseville, Calif

Arch Dermatol. 1978;114(6):968. doi:10.1001/archderm.1978.01640180098043

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Abstract

To the Editor.—  Six months ago I saw a young woman who complained of hair loss. She had obvious hair loss from the frontal scalp to the occiput in a linear distribution along either side of the vertex.Examination of the hairs showed no microscopic abnormality, and the scalp appeared entirely normal. The hair was parted through the central portion of the involved area, and I felt that traction might have been involved in the hair loss pattern. The patient denied traction, and stated that she brushed infrequently. I again saw this patient four months later for a different problem. I asked her how her hair was doing, and she stated, "it is growing back now that I have stopped using the balance beam."The balance beam is an apparatus used by gymnasts. During practice, head stands and rollovers are performed repeatedly. One can imagine the amount of traction applied

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