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Article
December 1978

Society Transactions

Arch Dermatol. 1978;114(12):1864. doi:10.1001/archderm.1978.01640240082037

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Abstract

PHILADELPHIA DERMATOLOGICAL SOCIETY  Feb 20, 1976Waine C. Johnson, MD, Recorder

Sézary Cell Syndrome (Small Cell variant). Presented by E. Bondi, MD, James Leyden, MD, and Thomas Ross, MD  A 60-year-old man gives a four-year history of recurrent eruptions of the hands and feet that were diagnosed as chromate dermatitis. He has had generalized pruritus, intermittent erythroderma, and patchy alopecia for two years. There has been a progressive infiltration of the skin of the forehead and scalp for the past six months. Physical examination reveals a mild erythroderma, hyperkeratosis of palms and soles, patchy alopecia, nontender infiltration of the skin of the forehead, ears, and scalp, and bilateral inguinal and right epitrochlear lymphadenopathy. A WBC count showed 89% lymphocytes. Bone marrow showed 19% plasma cells and 4% lymphocytes. Sixty-four percent of the circulating lymphocytes formed erythrocyte rosettes. Biopsy specimens of the skin and inguinal lymph node were interpreted as mycosis fungoides. Chlorambucil (Leukeran) therapy has been ineffective.

Discussion  Eric C. Vonderheid

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