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Article
January 1981

The Impact of Medicare on Academic Dermatology

Arch Dermatol. 1981;117(1):5. doi:10.1001/archderm.1981.01650010011013

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Abstract

Universal Medicare was introduced in Canada in two phases. About 20 years ago, all citizens were entitled to hospitalization without direct payment. Either the cost was shared by the taxpayers or covered by some form of premium paid by all who could afford it. In 1970, this was expanded to cover all health care, including physicians' fees. This program was partially underwritten by the federal government, but as health care is a provincial responsibility, each of the ten provinces administers its own scheme, with considerable, though minor, variations.

Since initiation of the Medicare plan, many problems have developed, but by and large the public is satisfied and likes the program. The opinion of the physicians varies a good deal from province to province and from specialty to specialty.

Has this universal medical program had any serious impact on academic dermatology? My first reaction to this question was that it has

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