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Article
May 1982

Vitamin E Toxicity

Author Affiliations

Philadelphia

Arch Dermatol. 1982;118(5):289. doi:10.1001/archderm.1982.01650170003001

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Abstract

To the Editor.—  The cautionary commentary by Roberts1 on vitamin E toxicity stimulates me to record my observations.I conduct an Aging Skin Clinic at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia. A rare opportunity is presented to find out what middle-class, middle-aged white women think is dietetically healthful.While all are in excellent health, few begin the day without taking vitamins, usually with other supplements such as various minerals. For the most part, I look on this with restrained amusement and see no great harm in such oral rites. Occasionally, I spot some cutaneous changes (ie, dry or scaling skin) from excessive intake of vitamin A. I do gently chide those who take 3 to 4 g/day of vitamin C, but this seems harmless enough and is good for the economy.In the past year, I have begun to worry about vitamin E toxicity. The daily requirements for

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